Olympic spirit blows over Monaco race area
4 May 2017
Race Day 1 kicks off at 470 Europeans
8 May 2017

Cluster Yachting Monaco Rendezvous sets course for future of yachting

One year after the success of the first Cluster Yachting Monaco Rendezvous, more than 200 professionals gathered for the second edition held in the Yacht Club de Monaco. It was attended by YCM General Secretary and Cluster President, Bernard d’Alessandri, for whom the event “was an opportunity to take stock of the sector and discuss issues driving change in the industry.” Protecting the environment is one topic that monopolised the discussions.

 

The future: a present obsession

 

 

“Protecting the environment has become a necessity,” stated Robert Calcagno, CEO of the Oceanographic Institute of Monaco. The scope of actions taken by the Principality in the environmental field transcends borders and is “an integral part of a legitimacy embodied by the Principality. There is a legacy in the field of environmental preservation attributable to Monaco.” The number of major initiatives led by Monaco, such as the Monaco Blue Initiative, Monaco Ocean Awards and Monaco Exploration, have given it a well-defined role in environmental policy.

 

This extends to Monaco’s control over its own projects, such as the land extension due to be completed in 2025 that will “gain six hectares from the sea but with full respect for the seabed,” as explained by Daniela Burla, Director of quality, security and the environment at L’Anse du Portier company. Plans include reserving 500m2 to grow-on transplanted Posidonia oceanica, a world first. And then there is the evolution in eco-friendly moorings and anchorages developed by Catalano Shipping, a Monaco company represented here by Laurent Certaldi: “Today these buoys can be used by boats over 70m in length which was unthinkable before.”

 

 

 

Building the boats of tomorrow

 

 

The Monaco Solar & Electric Boat Challenge being organised by the YCM from 13-15 July for the fourth consecutive year, in partnership with the UIM (Union Internationale Motonautique) and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, puts the spotlight on energy sources of the future. It brings together a fleet of boats powered by electricity and the sun, built by engineering students working with prestigious boatyards: “Our ambition is to encourage universities and boatyards to design and build solar and electric-powered race boats that could be marketed in the future,” explains Marco Casiraghi, an engineer behind the event.

 

It was an opportunity for delegates to learn more about various projects aimed at reducing a yacht’s carbon footprint, such as Feadship’s Savannah. Capable of fuel savings up to 28% due to a jumbo-sized propeller combined with removing appendages under the hull, it contains features that make it “an exemplary yacht in terms of energy efficiency,” says Bas Nederpelt, Business Management Developer at the Feadship yard. For Stéphane Leveel from Perini Navi: “The life cycle of a boat and its usage have an impact on the environment, and it is up to us to anticipate that”. The priority is the same for Vienna Eleuteri from VSY: “Today we no longer choose between science, technology and nature. We are working on raw materials that are more respectful of the environment. We must continue down this road.”

 

The topic resurfaced throughout the day’s talks, for example that by Romain Troublé involved in the Tara project. Over the last 13 years, the schooner has completed ten expeditions, covering 350,000km, taking in some 40 countries and gathering data “that enables us to see the impact of climate change and the ecological crisis gripping our oceans”.

 

 

Minimising risks

 

 

While the environment may have monopolised the floor, pollution was also on the agenda. “We must raise awareness among owners of the legal and insurance aspects,” notes Nicolas Mior from Ascoma Maritime, a view echoed by Jamie Edmiston of Edmiston and Company.

A boat that pollutes affects the whole industry’s image, says Michel Buffat of Credit Suisse – “Reputation is very important. The public gets very concerned when they see a boat that pollutes.”

 

To make owners more attentive to these issues it’s imperative “to simplify current legislation which may be holding back owners,” warns Edouard Mousny from Gordon S. Blair who is Vice-President of the Cluster Yachting Monaco. He points the finger at “the 60 international conventions relating to the sector”. It’s a vision shared by Paul Miller from HiscoxMGA, while Julia Stewart from Imperial and Hans Konings from Amels talked about how to educate the market on green technology such as hybrid systems. “Systems like these today lessen impact on the environment while improving propulsion, fuel consumption, noise, etc.”, says Hans Konings. Respectful and more efficient is enough to attract the customer.

 

 

Healthy growth

 

 

The day was not just about taking stock of Monaco’s yachting sector, but also defining its ambitions, as Hassan Mouheb from Nielsen Lifestyle pointes out: “By 2025 turnover in Monaco is likely to top €1 billion (€750 million today) with an increase of 300 jobs in the sector which currently stands at 1,435. Together we can set this target – it’s a realistic ambition.”

 

The line to take is simple: stay focused on the targets while keeping a weather eye on the booming Asian sector. After a market survey, Hassan Mouheb could draw a map of the industry showing its strengths, such as heritage and Monaco’s international reputation, its climate, location, security, respect for privacy and quality of services. But the Principality is still Monegasque and solutions need to be found to a shortage of moorings in the two harbours, an issue picked up by SEPM Director Aleco Keusseoglou who gave an update on the port at Ventimiglia project: “This will be in operation by 2019-2020 with capacity to accommodate 170 yachts from 10m to 60m. It had to be done as there are 1,047 boats flying the Monaco flag and only 638 are berthed in Port Hercule and Fontvieille.”

 

Four major challenges emerged from the survey: develop resources required to absorb growth, coordinate and lead all stakeholders in a common shared agenda, and lastly define and instigate a policy of quality and excellence – all challenges on the Cluster Yachting Monaco’s road map.

 

 

Monaco – a land of expertise

 

 

While Monaco may have established itself as a preferred destination for yachts and the yachting industry, it also stands out as a pool of talent. Launched on 26th September 2016 at the instigation of the Cluster Yachting Monaco, the Master in Luxury Management at the International University of Monaco (UIM) has been a big success. Polina Arbuzova believes it is particularly suitable for this region: “It is an extremely buoyant market that offers countless opportunities, particularly here in Monaco. I really appreciate being able to discuss ideas with professionals who come to give the classes, and being involved in the different stages from order to delivery of a yacht. It’s inspiring.” 18 students are the paving the way.

 

And finally, designer Espen Oeino, Vice-President of the Cluster Yachting Monaco, ended the day’s agenda with a presentation on the REV (Research Expedition Vessel) he designed. The 181.6m vessel is for state-of-the-art scientific projects and operates on green energy: “The oceans cover 70% of our planet. It’s vital that we protect and look after them for future generations.”

 

Without a doubt, Monaco is the capital of yachting today and certainly tomorrow.

One year after the success of the first Cluster Yachting Monaco Rendezvous, more than 200 professionals gathered for the second edition held in the Yacht Club de Monaco. It was attended by YCM General Secretary and Cluster President, Bernard d’Alessandri, for whom the event “was an opportunity to take stock of the sector and discuss issues driving change in the industry.” Protecting the environment is one topic that monopolised the discussions.

 

The future: a present obsession

 

 

“Protecting the environment has become a necessity,” stated Robert Calcagno, CEO of the Oceanographic Institute of Monaco. The scope of actions taken by the Principality in the environmental field transcends borders and is “an integral part of a legitimacy embodied by the Principality. There is a legacy in the field of environmental preservation attributable to Monaco.” The number of major initiatives led by Monaco, such as the Monaco Blue Initiative, Monaco Ocean Awards and Monaco Exploration, have given it a well-defined role in environmental policy.

 

This extends to Monaco’s control over its own projects, such as the land extension due to be completed in 2025 that will “gain six hectares from the sea but with full respect for the seabed,” as explained by Daniela Burla, Director of quality, security and the environment at L’Anse du Portier company. Plans include reserving 500m2 to grow-on transplanted Posidonia oceanica, a world first. And then there is the evolution in eco-friendly moorings and anchorages developed by Catalano Shipping, a Monaco company represented here by Laurent Certaldi: “Today these buoys can be used by boats over 70m in length which was unthinkable before.”

 

 

 

Building the boats of tomorrow

 

 

The Monaco Solar & Electric Boat Challenge being organised by the YCM from 13-15 July for the fourth consecutive year, in partnership with the UIM (Union Internationale Motonautique) and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, puts the spotlight on energy sources of the future. It brings together a fleet of boats powered by electricity and the sun, built by engineering students working with prestigious boatyards: “Our ambition is to encourage universities and boatyards to design and build solar and electric-powered race boats that could be marketed in the future,” explains Marco Casiraghi, an engineer behind the event.

 

It was an opportunity for delegates to learn more about various projects aimed at reducing a yacht’s carbon footprint, such as Feadship’s Savannah. Capable of fuel savings up to 28% due to a jumbo-sized propeller combined with removing appendages under the hull, it contains features that make it “an exemplary yacht in terms of energy efficiency,” says Bas Nederpelt, Business Management Developer at the Feadship yard. For Stéphane Leveel from Perini Navi: “The life cycle of a boat and its usage have an impact on the environment, and it is up to us to anticipate that”. The priority is the same for Vienna Eleuteri from VSY: “Today we no longer choose between science, technology and nature. We are working on raw materials that are more respectful of the environment. We must continue down this road.”

 

The topic resurfaced throughout the day’s talks, for example that by Romain Troublé involved in the Tara project. Over the last 13 years, the schooner has completed ten expeditions, covering 350,000km, taking in some 40 countries and gathering data “that enables us to see the impact of climate change and the ecological crisis gripping our oceans”.

 

 

Minimising risks

 

 

While the environment may have monopolised the floor, pollution was also on the agenda. “We must raise awareness among owners of the legal and insurance aspects,” notes Nicolas Mior from Ascoma Maritime, a view echoed by Jamie Edmiston of Edmiston and Company.

A boat that pollutes affects the whole industry’s image, says Michel Buffat of Credit Suisse – “Reputation is very important. The public gets very concerned when they see a boat that pollutes.”

 

To make owners more attentive to these issues it’s imperative “to simplify current legislation which may be holding back owners,” warns Edouard Mousny from Gordon S. Blair who is Vice-President of the Cluster Yachting Monaco. He points the finger at “the 60 international conventions relating to the sector”. It’s a vision shared by Paul Miller from HiscoxMGA, while Julia Stewart from Imperial and Hans Konings from Amels talked about how to educate the market on green technology such as hybrid systems. “Systems like these today lessen impact on the environment while improving propulsion, fuel consumption, noise, etc.”, says Hans Konings. Respectful and more efficient is enough to attract the customer.

 

 

Healthy growth

 

 

The day was not just about taking stock of Monaco’s yachting sector, but also defining its ambitions, as Hassan Mouheb from Nielsen Lifestyle pointes out: “By 2025 turnover in Monaco is likely to top €1 billion (€750 million today) with an increase of 300 jobs in the sector which currently stands at 1,435. Together we can set this target – it’s a realistic ambition.”

 

The line to take is simple: stay focused on the targets while keeping a weather eye on the booming Asian sector. After a market survey, Hassan Mouheb could draw a map of the industry showing its strengths, such as heritage and Monaco’s international reputation, its climate, location, security, respect for privacy and quality of services. But the Principality is still Monegasque and solutions need to be found to a shortage of moorings in the two harbours, an issue picked up by SEPM Director Aleco Keusseoglou who gave an update on the port at Ventimiglia project: “This will be in operation by 2019-2020 with capacity to accommodate 170 yachts from 10m to 60m. It had to be done as there are 1,047 boats flying the Monaco flag and only 638 are berthed in Port Hercule and Fontvieille.”

 

Four major challenges emerged from the survey: develop resources required to absorb growth, coordinate and lead all stakeholders in a common shared agenda, and lastly define and instigate a policy of quality and excellence – all challenges on the Cluster Yachting Monaco’s road map.

 

 

Monaco – a land of expertise

 

 

While Monaco may have established itself as a preferred destination for yachts and the yachting industry, it also stands out as a pool of talent. Launched on 26th September 2016 at the instigation of the Cluster Yachting Monaco, the Master in Luxury Management at the International University of Monaco (UIM) has been a big success. Polina Arbuzova believes it is particularly suitable for this region: “It is an extremely buoyant market that offers countless opportunities, particularly here in Monaco. I really appreciate being able to discuss ideas with professionals who come to give the classes, and being involved in the different stages from order to delivery of a yacht. It’s inspiring.” 18 students are the paving the way.

 

And finally, designer Espen Oeino, Vice-President of the Cluster Yachting Monaco, ended the day’s agenda with a presentation on the REV (Research Expedition Vessel) he designed. The 181.6m vessel is for state-of-the-art scientific projects and operates on green energy: “The oceans cover 70% of our planet. It’s vital that we protect and look after them for future generations.”

 

Without a doubt, Monaco is the capital of yachting today and certainly tomorrow.