More than a century after the first international powerboating meetings that attracted the world’s leading industrialists, Monaco is reviving its past with the Solar & Energy Boat Challenge. Organised since 2014 by the Yacht Club de Monaco, supported by the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, Hydros Foundation and International Powerboating Federation (UIM), the meeting is in the image of the boats in the spotlight and continues to evolve. For this 5th edition, the concept has been open to all clean energy sources.

 

Industrialists and engineering students are working hand in hand to change an industry, a necessity according to YCM General Secretary Bernard d‘Alessandri: “Together they are building the future of yachting, laying the foundations and developing projects that are closer than ever to becoming a viable reality.”

 

 

Solar shines

 

Reinventing boating to meet energy and environmental imperatives is the concept that drew 200 competitors divided into 29 teams who responded to the call for this 5th Solar & Energy Boat Challenge.

 

The Netherlands continues to lead the way with 15 teams in competition including that of Gerhard van der Schaar. The pilot on Clafis Victron Energy Solar Boat Team is here again to defend the title he has held since the first meeting in 2014. At the end of the first day’s racing, he’s almost there with a win in the Fleet Endurance Race (Solar Class). With 24 laps in one hour, the Dutch Open Class boat swept the board, followed by the crew on Antwerp Maritime Academy in the Challenge A Class on 17 laps. Driven by Willem Maes, the Belgium boat has not missed an edition and their intention was to improve on their third place last year.

 

 

Monaco land of experimentation

 

With the Energy Class, a new category launched this year by the YCM, the Principality confirms its ranking as yachting capital. Teams had to build a cockpit and design the most powerful and durable propulsion system from a given amount of energy for a one-design catamaran hull. Be it Bio Fuel, battery, hydrogen, compressed air, LNG or anything else, the choice was wide as long it was a clean source.

 

For Nicolas Milanesio, the only Monegasque pilot in the competition on Monaco-Saint Tropez, the desire is there to develop this category: “We are in the test phase and the priority now is to continue the work started. But what we can say after this first experience is that the hull is very stable and slips over the water. Regards peak speed, I reached 26.8km/h”. Having started the Energy Class Endurance Race on Friday morning, Nicolas had to stop after 43 minutes 15 seconds, 4 nautical miles from the start due to lack of battery autonomy. “It was a fantastic experience. Our autonomy was down because we had to compensate  for the swell. We need to improve on yield, but we are so nearly there.”

 

 

The objective is to develop this category in order to “bring new solutions” explains Jérémie Lagarrigue, General Manager of Hydros Efficiency and organiser of the Hydrocontest in Saint-Tropez, first student contest dedicated to maritime energy (working on hulls). “It’s an obligation given that maritime transport represents 4% of global pollution and 90% of trade is by ship. We need to raise awareness among key players, ship builders, users and transporters.”

 

 

Three classes on parade

 

The YCM Marina was the stage for an exceptional spectacle as all the boats gathered amidst beautiful yachts and paraded one after the other to the delight and amazement of the crowds on the quay. Applauded by their teams, some contestants carried on outside Port Hercule for the rolling start speed record over a distance of one eighth of a nautical mile (231.5m).

 

 

Of all the classes represented, it was those in the Offshore Class who made their mark. But with 48.2km/h recorded on their second lap, the British Vita Yachts team led by David Gray still struggled to break the record held since 2016 by Gerhard van der Schaar and Clafis Victron Energy Solar Boat Team of 49.10 km/h.

 

 

Sharing knowledge live

 

At the end of each day, live on the Yacht Club de Monaco’s Facebook page (@yachtclubmonaco), Tech Talks give each team the chance to talk about their boat, explaining what they are trying to achieve and future projects. “It’s great being able to discuss our projects, our ideas and all these innovations in one forum,” notes Dinis Rodrigues, team leader of Técnico Solar Boat. “Our goal is to promote solar energy and to look at what others do to improve. We are trying to build a 100% Portuguese boat designed by us. It’s our passion.”

 

 

An initiative praised by Espen Oeino, designer and naval architect, also member of the Cluster Yachting Monaco, “This type of meeting is fantastic. It’s by discussing together that the industry can evolve as a whole. Today, it is only a question of time before we improve the storage capacity of a battery.”

 For members of the Dutch team on Engineers of Innovation, the objective announced in this Open Source exchange is to get closer to what is already being done in their waters: “We are inspired by a ferry that takes passengers from Amsterdam to the coast at 65km/h. We want to achieve that for our boat.” 

 

Suspense goes up another notch tomorrow for the five boats in the Offshore class for the Monaco-Ventimiglia-Monaco Endurance Race. This will be followed by the qualifiers then finals in the slalom for all classes.

 

Techtalks >> 

 

 

Provisional programme:

Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th July from 8.30am – 8.00pm:

Solar & Energy Boat Challenge Paddocks open (free entry)

 

 

Saturday 14th July:

9.00am:                       Pilots briefing

10.00am:                     Start of One-on-One Slalom qualifiers (Energy & Solar Classes)

10.00am:                     Start of Monaco-Ventimiglia-Monaco Endurance Race (Offshore Class)

2.00pm:                       Start of One-on-One Slalom finals (Energy Class)

3.00pm:                       Start of One-on-One Slalom finals (Solar Class)

4.00-6.00pm:              UIM Workshop

8.00pm:                       Closing dinner

 

More than a century after the first international powerboating meetings that attracted the world’s leading industrialists, Monaco is reviving its past with the Solar & Energy Boat Challenge. Organised since 2014 by the Yacht Club de Monaco, supported by the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, Hydros Foundation and International Powerboating Federation (UIM), the meeting is in the image of the boats in the spotlight and continues to evolve. For this 5th edition, the concept has been open to all clean energy sources.

 

Industrialists and engineering students are working hand in hand to change an industry, a necessity according to YCM General Secretary Bernard d‘Alessandri: “Together they are building the future of yachting, laying the foundations and developing projects that are closer than ever to becoming a viable reality.”

 

 

Solar shines

 

Reinventing boating to meet energy and environmental imperatives is the concept that drew 200 competitors divided into 29 teams who responded to the call for this 5th Solar & Energy Boat Challenge.

 

The Netherlands continues to lead the way with 15 teams in competition including that of Gerhard van der Schaar. The pilot on Clafis Victron Energy Solar Boat Team is here again to defend the title he has held since the first meeting in 2014. At the end of the first day’s racing, he’s almost there with a win in the Fleet Endurance Race (Solar Class). With 24 laps in one hour, the Dutch Open Class boat swept the board, followed by the crew on Antwerp Maritime Academy in the Challenge A Class on 17 laps. Driven by Willem Maes, the Belgium boat has not missed an edition and their intention was to improve on their third place last year.

 

 

Monaco land of experimentation

 

With the Energy Class, a new category launched this year by the YCM, the Principality confirms its ranking as yachting capital. Teams had to build a cockpit and design the most powerful and durable propulsion system from a given amount of energy for a one-design catamaran hull. Be it Bio Fuel, battery, hydrogen, compressed air, LNG or anything else, the choice was wide as long it was a clean source.

 

For Nicolas Milanesio, the only Monegasque pilot in the competition on Monaco-Saint Tropez, the desire is there to develop this category: “We are in the test phase and the priority now is to continue the work started. But what we can say after this first experience is that the hull is very stable and slips over the water. Regards peak speed, I reached 26.8km/h”. Having started the Energy Class Endurance Race on Friday morning, Nicolas had to stop after 43 minutes 15 seconds, 4 nautical miles from the start due to lack of battery autonomy. “It was a fantastic experience. Our autonomy was down because we had to compensate  for the swell. We need to improve on yield, but we are so nearly there.”

 

 

The objective is to develop this category in order to “bring new solutions” explains Jérémie Lagarrigue, General Manager of Hydros Efficiency and organiser of the Hydrocontest in Saint-Tropez, first student contest dedicated to maritime energy (working on hulls). “It’s an obligation given that maritime transport represents 4% of global pollution and 90% of trade is by ship. We need to raise awareness among key players, ship builders, users and transporters.”

 

 

Three classes on parade

 

The YCM Marina was the stage for an exceptional spectacle as all the boats gathered amidst beautiful yachts and paraded one after the other to the delight and amazement of the crowds on the quay. Applauded by their teams, some contestants carried on outside Port Hercule for the rolling start speed record over a distance of one eighth of a nautical mile (231.5m).

 

 

Of all the classes represented, it was those in the Offshore Class who made their mark. But with 48.2km/h recorded on their second lap, the British Vita Yachts team led by David Gray still struggled to break the record held since 2016 by Gerhard van der Schaar and Clafis Victron Energy Solar Boat Team of 49.10 km/h.

 

 

Sharing knowledge live

 

At the end of each day, live on the Yacht Club de Monaco’s Facebook page (@yachtclubmonaco), Tech Talks give each team the chance to talk about their boat, explaining what they are trying to achieve and future projects. “It’s great being able to discuss our projects, our ideas and all these innovations in one forum,” notes Dinis Rodrigues, team leader of Técnico Solar Boat. “Our goal is to promote solar energy and to look at what others do to improve. We are trying to build a 100% Portuguese boat designed by us. It’s our passion.”

 

 

An initiative praised by Espen Oeino, designer and naval architect, also member of the Cluster Yachting Monaco, “This type of meeting is fantastic. It’s by discussing together that the industry can evolve as a whole. Today, it is only a question of time before we improve the storage capacity of a battery.”

 For members of the Dutch team on Engineers of Innovation, the objective announced in this Open Source exchange is to get closer to what is already being done in their waters: “We are inspired by a ferry that takes passengers from Amsterdam to the coast at 65km/h. We want to achieve that for our boat.” 

 

Suspense goes up another notch tomorrow for the five boats in the Offshore class for the Monaco-Ventimiglia-Monaco Endurance Race. This will be followed by the qualifiers then finals in the slalom for all classes.

 

Techtalks >> 

 

 

Provisional programme:

Thursday 12th to Saturday 14th July from 8.30am – 8.00pm:

Solar & Energy Boat Challenge Paddocks open (free entry)

 

 

Saturday 14th July:

9.00am:                       Pilots briefing

10.00am:                     Start of One-on-One Slalom qualifiers (Energy & Solar Classes)

10.00am:                     Start of Monaco-Ventimiglia-Monaco Endurance Race (Offshore Class)

2.00pm:                       Start of One-on-One Slalom finals (Energy Class)

3.00pm:                       Start of One-on-One Slalom finals (Solar Class)

4.00-6.00pm:              UIM Workshop

8.00pm:                       Closing dinner